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Rap Sheet to Resume

Collaborative social art project with safe re-entry advocate Johnny Perez, social worker Susan Goodwillie, curator Marisa Morán Jahn, and fourteen individuals with histories of incarceration. This project blends professional development training with a social/aesthetic investigation. Individuals transitioning from incarceration to freedom often face steep barriers to securing employment. Participants retooled past skills to develop a professional resume while learning approaches from the visual arts to deepen and expand how they perceive and present themselves. Beyond the benefits to individual participants, the collaborative effort will result in a public program and an exhibition at the Urban Justice Center, NY (2015). As an organization, Urban Justice Center supports the New York City’s most vulnerable residents.

    Touching Revolution: Radical Vision and Creative Responses to Mass Incarceration


In April 2015, I co-facilitated a project for the Open Engagement artists’ conference at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. This year’s conference themes were “place” and “revolution.”  Artists Mark Strandquist, Courtney Bowles and I came up with a 90-minute live program we called Touching Revolution: Radical Vision and Creative Responses to Mass Incarceration. Using Skype and other virtual platforms, we brought together activists, artists, and communities from around the country who are using artistic strategies and cultural production to confront and radically re-imagine criminal justice issues.

 

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Love for Love Stakeholder Feedback Meeting 


The morning after the public premiere, key community participants gathered to reflect on their participation in Love for Love, and to consider the significance of its inclusion in the exhibition, More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s. (2013) at The Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. The first phase of this project was realized in collaboration with eight organizations and 120 community participants. Whether it’s morning after a premiere or six months after a project’s completion, it is my practice to conduct stakeholder feedback meetings. Repeatedly I have found unexpected yet critical outcomes had resulted from the relationships emerging from our process.

 

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Re-Entry: An Evening Beyond Black and White


In June 2012, I hosted It’s not just black and white: a film screening and performance at the Phoenix Art Museum. The first half of the program presented a film screening. During the screening, men and women from the re-entry community helped stage a series of interruptions in the expected movie-viewing experience. The audience become increasingly aware that their fellow audience members were related to and part of the film that they were passively watching. In the last minutes of the film, twenty-seven Honored Guests moved to the stage and then led a conversation comprising the second half of the program. The book project is an attempt to recreate a sense of the actual event and a snap shot of that inquisitive, suggestive and open-ended experience.

 

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It's not just black and white

The It’s not just black and white (2011) exhibition gave voice to the multiple constituents who are involved with the corrections, incarceration and the criminal justice systems. The ASU Art Museum gallery space served as a site for developing and displaying visual and mediated exhibitions, dance and other staged events, discussions, readings and performances. As the title, It’s not just black and white implies, the intent of the project was to explore and expose the many often conflicting viewpoints, perspectives and values that generate from serious considerations of justice and public safety.

 

Life is Life

Working nationally, his smaller projects organize framworks for individuals directly affected by the system, connecting them with communities and initiating discourse around charged social problems. Life is Life (2011) featured artwork created with inmates sentenced to life-without-parole at the Pennsylvania State Correctional Institution, Graterford.

 

 

 
Bienvenidos here! at the Welcome Diner

Bienvenidos here! at the Welcome Diner

Bienvenidos here! at the Welcome Diner (2009) brought together residents of the Garfield neighborhood (80% Mexican/ Mexican-American), the local arts crowd, and the university community. The event featured a local church youth band singing in Spanish, local DJs, a live video feed installation, and a screening of “Food,” a 1974 Gordon Matta-Clark film.

 

 

 
Go Ahead, Wonder

Go Ahead, Wonder

Go Ahead, Wonder (2009) posed a simple question for Phoenicians: “Ever wonder about the future of this place?” Starting with a full page of the Phoenix New Times, Best of Phoenix issue (70,000 distributed), Gregory Sale and poet Kimi Eisele invited readers to leave a one-minute voice message, e-mail 100 words, or be interviewed at the opening of the “Phoenix as Wonderland” exhibition.

 
Love Buttons, Love Bites Series

Love Buttons, Love Bites series   Love Buttons Stuck on You Butt-ins Love Buttons in Local Produce Love Buttons in Cicloviaérea Love Bites Love Buttons, Love Bites Additional Studio Works Love Buttons, Love Bites Website

Love Buttons, Love Bites series (2008–2010) takes on love, loss, and language by flirting with the fluid parameters of public and private, prose and poem. Sale initiated this process by going public with poetic language and evocative text fragments, in the exchange of campaign-style buttons, in text printed on large aluminum signs, in text drawings on paper, and in participatory activities.

 
Things we'd rip off

Things we’d rip off

Things we’d rip off (2008) questioned methodologies that attempt to affix meaning and value to contemporary art-school training within the context of a university art faculty exhibition. The project also functioned as a survey not only of tenured and tenure-track faculty, but also adjunct associates, graduate teaching assistants, and others not ordinarily included in such exhibitions.

 
Love Stories

Love Stories

Love Stories (2007) inserted a body of intimate, text-based works into the increasingly divisive dialogue surrounding gay rights issues. A political climate in which Arizona citizens continue to reject diversity in favor of anti-queer laws sets a poignant backdrop for this body of work.

 
Reprint

Reprint

Reprint (2007). In Do Me, members of an informal arts collective were assigned a name of another member and were tasked to make art in the style of the other member, in a space of a standard frame from IKEA. Assigned to writer/art critic Deborah Sussman Susser, Sale wrote a review of the Do Me exhibition, which appeared in print in the Phoenix New Times and was shown simultaneously in the exhibition.

 
Hair Series

Hair series

Hair series (2006–2008). From text-based scores written with Liquid-Plumr, to depilatory wax and hair cast-offs, to a participatory performance, this series is designed to push the envelope of hair art, translating it for a modern audience and inviting the viewer to reconsider preconceived notions of the medium.

 

 

 
Looking for Yoko Ono

 

Looking for Yoko Ono

Looking for Yoko Ono (2002-2006). Butting into a Yoko Ono piece, Sale engaged clandestine communication with audience members attending the Yes Yoko Ono exhibition at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Ono's original piece presents a telephone and label that reads: "If the phone rings, answer it and speak with Yoko Ono." Sale called once daily (like Ono) and spoke with whomever answered.

 
Binkie Bears

Binkie Bears

Binkie Bears (2001, 2004, 2007, 2010) From a padded freight elevator in a Los Angeles gallery to a 60’-by-20’ reading area at the Phoenix Children’s Museum, this series of installations and felt-covered sculptures loosely functions as museum furniture, as oversized stuffed animals, and as catalysts for social gathering, public displays of intimacy and play.

 
Trace Value series

Trace Value series

Trace Value series (2005-2007), from a collaboration with a trusts and estates lawyer on a wedding gift/certificate (Till death do us part, 2007) that can be redeemed for two simple wills, to a photo-radar Self-portrait: Courtesy City of Scottsdale, Focus on Safety, each investigation plays in the fertile ground of assessing value for art and non-secular collaborations.

 
Phoenix is on Fire

Phoenix is on Fire

Phoenix is on Fire (2004). Exploring the fabric of what makes up “Phoenix,” Sale collaborated with artist Cyndi Coon to contact more than 500 area businesses and organizations that feature “Phoenix” as the first word in their name. As a social art/ research project, the collaborators produced a set of accordion-style tourist postcards as a hybrid artwork/final report.

 
Welcome to the Love Line

Welcome to the Love Line

Welcome to the Love Line (2004). As part of Elective Acts, a three-day group project, opening on election night 2004, Welcome to the Love Line existed as a ‘social art practice sketch’ that initiated a new body of work focusing on public/private declarations of love during charged political times.

 
America's Telemarketers Think I am a Girl

America’s Telemarketers Think I am a Girl

America’s Telemarketers Think I am a Girl (2003). America’s telemarketers have let Sale know that he stills sound like a girl when he answers the phone. Seven short texts and seven interpretive drawings reveal some of the complexities hidden in this mundane series of telephone conversations.

 
On Location

On Location

On Location (2002). Sale assumed the role of a ‘newscaster’ for the Santa Barbara Summer Solstice parade, complete with cameraman and sound equipment. Fundamentally, brief interviews of the various participants were amplified for the parade spectators to hear live as Sale worked his way from the front to the back of the parade.

 
Touching Revolution

Touching Revolution

Touching Revolution (2000) entailed a series of telephone interviews with people from around the world for whom the experience of revolution figured prominently. These personal conversations were presented live to a large audience in a public museum (Phoenix Art Museum) in an environment staged to mimic a news talk show.

 
Testing Waters

Testing Waters

Testing Waters (1997) explored personal dilemmas of being an "AIDS widow," i.e., a surviving partner of a person who has died of AIDS. For the performance, I wore one pair of britches and carried another pair attached by a long appendage. I talked to people, offered to read them evocative stories, and invited selected individuals to go on a date and wear the other pair of britches.

 
Moving Forward with Awareness and Compassion

Moving Forward with Awareness and Compassion

Moving Forward with Awareness and Compassion (1996) involved over 100 high school students in a collaborative project that examined cultural, political and emotional awareness of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In a series of art pieces, students participated with Sale in developing an artistic vision to first recognize and then voice their personal relationship to the HIV/AIDS crisis.

 
 
Copyright © 2009 - Gregory Sale Art